Benefits of Rotary

There are many reasons to join a local Rotary club:

Networking

An original goal of Rotary was to allow club members to meet periodically and enlarge their circle of business and professional acquaintances. As members of the oldest service club in the world, Rotarians represent a cross-section of their community’s business owners, executives, managers, political leaders, and professionals – people who make decisions and influence policy.

Service

Club members have many opportunities for humanitarian service, both locally and internationally. Service programs address concerns such as health care, hunger, poverty, illiteracy, and the environment. Rotarians regularly experience the fulfillment that comes from giving back to the community.

Friendship

Rotary was founded on fellowship, a cornerstone that continues to attract members today. Rotarians enjoy camaraderie with like-minded professionals, and club projects provide opportunities to develop enduring friendships. Club members who travel have friendly contacts in almost every city of the world.

Family

Rotary sponsors some of the world’s largest exchange and educational programs. Rotary clubs provide innovative training opportunities and mentoring for young leaders, and they involve family members in a wide range of social and service activities.

Ethics

Encouraging high ethical standards and respect for all worthy vocations has been a hallmark of Rotary from its earliest days. In their business and professional lives, Rotarians abide by The Four-Way Test:
Of the things we think, say or do

  1. Is it the TRUTH?
  2. Is it FAIR to all concerned?
  3. Will it build GOODWILL and BETTER FRIENDSHIPS?
  4. Will it be BENEFICIAL to all concerned?

Leadership

Rotary is an organization of successful professionals. Team-building, fundraising, public speaking, planning, organization, and communication are just some of the leadership skills that club members can exercise and enhance. Being a Rotary leader provides further experience in motivating, inspiring, and guiding others.

Member Responsibilities

The club is the cornerstone of Rotary, where the most meaningful work is carried out. All effective Rotary clubs are responsible for four key elements: sustaining or increasing their membership base, participating in service projects that benefit their own community and those in other countries, supporting The Rotary Foundation of RI financially and through program participation, and developing leaders capable of serving in Rotary beyond the club level.

What Rotarians get out of Rotary depends largely on what they put into it. Many membership requirements are designed to help members more fully participate in and enjoy their Rotary experience.

Attendance

Attending weekly club meetings allows members to enjoy their club’s fellowship, enrich their professional and personal knowledge, and meet other business leaders in their community. Many larger communities offer clubs with different meeting times, including early morning, the lunch hour, after work, and evening.

If members miss their own club’s meeting, they’re encouraged to expand their Rotary horizons by attending make-up meetings at any Rotary club in the world — a practice that guarantees Rotarians a warm welcome in communities around the globe. Find meeting places and times in the Official Directory or through the Club Locator.

In some cases, Rotarians can make up meetings by participating in a club service project or attending a club board meeting or a Rotaract or Interact club meeting. Members can also make up online at one of several Rotary e-clubs.

Service

All Rotary clubs share a key mission: to serve their community and those in need throughout the world. By participating in club service projects, members learn about their club’s involvement in local and international projects and can volunteer their time and talents where they are most needed.

Finding and keeping members

To keep clubs strong, every Rotarian must share the responsibility of bringing new people into Rotary. Even new members can bring guests to meetings or invite them to participate in a service project. The value of Rotary speaks for itself, and the best way to spark the interest of potential members is by letting them experience fellowship and service firsthand.

Keeping members interested in Rotary is another responsibility. Good club fellowship and early involvement in service projects are two of the best ways to sustain the club’s membership.

The ideal composition of a Rotary club reflects the community’s demographics, including professions, gender, age, and ethnicity. Such diversity enriches every aspect of the club’s fellowship and service.